Wheat – the “perfect chronic poison”

September 7, 2015
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Today’s wheat is not your grandmother’s wheat! Modern varieties have been genetically modified to increase production. In the process, wheat has become the “perfect, chronic poison,” according to Dr. William Davis, author of Wheat Belly.

droppedImageCompared to the wheat of 50 years ago, the so-called complex carbohydrates from today’s “whole grains” are rapidly broken down by gut enzymes into simple sugars. This leads to higher blood sugar and insulin levels, just like simple sugars and refined/white grain products. More insulin leads to more fat storage.

In addition to gluten, wheat contains gliadins, glycoproteins with properties similar to opiates, which actually increase appetite – to the tune of 400 more calories per day, according to Dr. Davis. No wonder that so many people readily admit to being “carb addicts!” Gliadins are also thought to cause or exacerbate a variety of health problems including allergies, bowel problems, and chronic inflammation.

Together with the appetite stimulation, this one-two punch has led to a dramatic increase in obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and more.

Most people agree that they should limit simple sugars and white/refined grain products. However, switching to eating more whole grains is much like smoking filtered cigarettes instead of non-filtered smokes — one is a tad less deadly.

Many who seem to be unable to lose weight, suddenly begin to drop the pounds when they give up wheat. Diabetes-related issues improve dramatically, arthritis symptoms improve, and bowel issues resolve in many patients.

“So what am I supposed to eat?” you might ask. I’d recommend organic meat, chicken, fish, fresh vegetables and low glycemic fruits like berries. Try it for 3 months and see what happens. The proof is in the results.

Adapted from http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505269_162-57505149/modern-wheat-a-perfect-chronic-poison-doctor-says/


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Posted in Blog, Exercise/Nutrition News by rishman